SOUTHSIDE REEFS, TOBAGO

Along the south coast of Tobago are three dives sites. From east to west, they are Cove Reef, Flying Reef and Stingray Alley. Coral reefs in this area are gently sloping and exposed to high currents. These are the haunts of large schools of reef fish including grunts and chub.

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ARNOS VALE BAY, TOBAGO

Arnos Vale Bay on Tobago’s Caribbean coast is a popular snorkel and diving destination, including night diving in the bay. The Arnos Vale reef extends outward from the bay along the eastern and western fringes, where the reef grows on submerged rocks. Divers can swim through channels covered in corals, sea fans and sponges.

PLYMOUTH REEF, TOBAGO

Just off Plymouth Point (adjacent to the Plymouth recreational grounds), this well-developed spur and groove reef is dominant in sea plumes and sea rods.

IGUANA BAY, TOBAGO

Iguana Bay is located north of Charlotteville and can only be accessed by boat. Although there are coral communities, there is little structure, likely because of the exposed wave environment. It is home to some colonies of the incredible rare Acropora cervicornis.

CORAL GARDENS, TOBAGO

Coral Gardens is a small patch reef located in the Bon Accord Lagoon in the Buccoo Reef Marine Protected Area. This is one of the better-known treasures of Buccoo Reef. It is visited daily by snorkelers and glass bottom boat tours. Coral Gardens in dominant in the reef building coral Orbicella annularis, also known as the potato coral, and hosts many reef fish.

GOAT ISLAND, TOBAGO

Located off Speyside, Goat Island features a house nestled between two giant rocks. Coral reefs wrap right around the island. The most famous reef is called Angel Reef, which lies along the western bay; it is dominant in hard corals and is one of the more biodiverse reefs on the island. Japanese Gardens on the south side of the island is well-known for its colourful sponge communities.

CULLODEN BAY, TOBAGO

Culloden Bay is home to a unique spur and groove coral reef formed by water movement. The growth of corals over time has created these rocky underwater spurs that project out to sea like fingers. Each spur is separated by a sandy groove where one can find turtles, eels and lionfish lurking.

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